COVID-19 ECE Collaborative Executive Summary, 2021/2022

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Table of Contents | The Collaborative Snapshot 4 | The Collaborative History A. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry B. American Academy of Pediatrics C. Association of State Public Health Nutritionists D. Association of State and Territorial Health Officials E. Children’s Environmental Health Network F. National Association of County and City Health Officials G. National Center for Healthy Housing H. National Environmental Health Association 6 | The Collaborative in Action – Embodying the Strategies of Health in All Policies to Foster Collaboration A. The Collaborative in Action: The Nuts and Bolts of Coordination B. The Collaborative in Action: Key Successes of the Collaborative Model 11 | The Collaborative Impact 14 | The Collaborative Data Drive 15 | The Collaborative Summary 16 | Acknowledgement 18 Appendix A. Resources Developed B. Translated Resources 19 22

The practice of environmental health plays an important role in reducing the spread of COVID-19, specifically in the areas of sanitation, disinfection, food safety, and indoor air quality. The need for guidance on safer cleaning practices and how to improve indoor air quality is especially necessary in early care and education (ECE) facilities, where many children spend a majority of their active hours during the day and may be at increased risk for exposure to COVID-19 and other environmental health hazards. To meet this challenge and provide coordination around ECErelated guidance in the early days of the pandemic, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) provided support to establish the COVID-19 Early Care and Education Collaborative in mid-2020. The ECE Collaborative, convened by the National Environmental Health Association (NEHA), served as a forum to bring together key environmental health organizations, each with their own specialization and constituents, to better coordinate activities and messaging during the beginning of the pandemic before vaccinations were available. Convening a broad range of organizations ensured that messaging was both coordinated and tailored to the ECE community including ECE facilities, home-based childcare settings, clinicians and other health care providers, and public health organizations. Collaborative members worked to identify needs and gaps and, in response, developed educational materials, webinars, and trainings on priority topics including safe cleaning, disinfection, food handling, and improving indoor air quality during the early stages of the COVID-19 response. Collaborative members also created tools for engagement and relationship building between ECE facilities and health departments that can be carried on in a post-pandemic environment. This project serves as an example of how collaborative partnerships, utilizing Health in All Policies principles, can be rapidly established and implemented in real time to holistically address public health challenges and protect children’s health. THE COLLABORATIVE SNAPSHOT COVID-19 ECE COLLABORATIVE 4

partners collaborating Over 1.5 million collective downloads Over 800,000 page views of resources 12 videos 93 resources generated 11 on-the-job resources developed 29 fact sheets 28 infographics Key documents translated into 8 other languages Over 2 Million connections to people/organizations 30+ partnerships formed 10 webinars conducted 5 audience tailored resource webpages developed Here are just a few of the many examples of how these professionals from diverse organizations were able to coordinate around key environmental health issues because of ATSDR’s establishment of the COVID-19 Early Care and Education Collaborative. “The need for guidance on safer cleaning practices and how to improve indoor air quality is especially necessary in early care and education facilities.”

During the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a demonstrated need for clear and consistent information for how to work to mitigate the risk of getting COVID-19 among children in the places where they live, learn, and play. Information was especially needed for ECE facilities, where many children spend most of their active hours during the day and may be at increased risk for exposure to COVID-19 and other environmental health hazards. The Collaborative was established for organizations to share best practices and share the needs they were hearing from their membership. In addition, the work was to focus on environmental health issues specifically that arose due to the COVID-19 pandemic that applied to ECEs. To meet this challenge and provide coordination for ECE-related resources and tools, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry provided support to establish the COVID-19 Early Care and Education Collaborative. THE COLLABORATIVE HISTORY COVID-19 ECE COLLABORATIVE 6

The COVID–19 Early Care and Education Collaborative identified gaps and developed more than 90 resources to educate a range of community collaborators who support early care and education of children across the nation.

The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), based in Atlanta, Georgia, is a federal public health agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. ATSDR protects communities from harmful health effects related to exposure to natural and man-made hazardous substances by responding to environmental health emergencies, investigating emerging environmental health threats, conducting research on the health impacts of hazardous waste sites, and building capabilities of and providing actionable guidance to state and local health partners. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) was founded in 1930 to serve as an independent forum to address children’s health needs. At that time, the idea that children had unique developmental and health needs was new. Practices that are now standard preventive care were only just beginning to become recognized instead of the prevailing custom of treating children as “miniature adults.” AAP is committed to the optimal physical, mental, and social health and well-being for all infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. The Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit (PEHSU), coordinated by the AAP through support from ATSDR and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, serve as a national network of experts in the prevention, diagnosis, management, and treatment of health issues that arise from environmental exposures from preconception through adolescence. There are 10 regional PEHSUs, each responsible for a different geographical region of the U.S. Each PEHSU is based at an academic health institution with experts in pediatrics, allergy/immunology, neurodevelopment, toxicology, occupational and environmental medicine, nursing, and reproductive health, as well as other specialized areas. The PEHSUs work together to address reproductive and children’s environmental health issues that affect families and communities, including safer disinfectant use (especially during the COVID-19 pandemic), wildfire smoke, PFAS, lead, pesticides, mold, and many more. American Academy of Pediatrics and Their Coordination of the Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units (PEHSUs) Early & Edu COVID-19 Early Care and Education Collaborative Organizations COVID-19 ECE COLLABORATIVE 8

COVID-19 Early Care and Education Collaborative Organizations Association of State Public Health Nutritionists Association of State and Territorial Health Officials Children’s Environmental Health Network Founded in 1952, the Association of State Public Health Nutritionists (ASPHN) is a nonprofit membership organization that provides state and national leadership on food and nutrition policy, programs, and services aimed at improving the health of our population. ASPHN’s membership is composed of more than 700 public health nutritionists located throughout all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and five U.S. territories. ASPHN’s vision is to create new environmental norms where healthy eating and active living are the easy and natural choices for all people living in the U.S. The ASPHN mission is to strengthen nutrition policy, programs, and environments for all people through development of public health nutrition leaders and collective action of members nationwide. The Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) is a national, nonprofit organization that represents public health agencies in the U.S., its territories, and the District of Columbia, as well as the over 100,000 public health professionals these agencies employ. ASTHO’s primary function is to track, evaluate, and advise members on the impact and formation of public or private health policy that may affect them and to provide guidance and technical assistance on improving the nation’s health. ASTHO’s Environmental Health Program helps state and territorial public health agencies build their capacity to respond to environmental public health challenges. ASTHO provides resources for these agencies on emerging environmental health issues and influences discussions and policy making around environmental health to ensure the inclusion of state and territorial health perspectives in developing policy. The Children’s Environmental Health Network (CEHN) is a national multidisciplinary organization whose mission is to protect the developing child from environmental health hazards and promote a healthier environment. CEHN has been working at the national level for nearly 30 years on policy, education, and support of pediatric research vital to children’s environmental health. CEHN has partnered with local and national professional and advocacy organizations and local, state, and federal government agencies. CEHN has also worked with a wide range of stakeholders including parents, youth, legislators, researchers, physicians, nurses, clergy, and childcare professionals. CEHN’s Eco-Healthy Child Care® program has worked nationally for over 10 years to partner with childcare professionals to eliminate or reduce environmental health hazards found in early childhood learning environments. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 9

National Center for Healthy Housing National Environmental Health Association National Association of County and City Health Officials The mission of the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) is to improve the health of communities by strengthening and advocating for local health departments. NACCHO is the only organization dedicated to serving every local health department in the nation. NACCHO serves approximately 3,000 local health departments and is the leader in providing cutting-edge, skill-building, professional resources and programs; seeking health equity; and supporting effective local public health practice and systems. The mission of the National Center for Health Housing (NCHH) is "Transforming lives by transforming housing." Through partnerships, community-based research, and advocacy, NCHH strives to reduce health disparities by translating credible science into tools and catalyzing systems change in low-income communities. This endeavor is most effective through partnerships, practical research, community capacity building, and data-driven advocacy and awareness building. NCHH equips leaders in the public health, housing, and environmental sectors with the data, tools, policies, and best practices they need to improve housing quality in their communities. The National Environmental Health Association’s (NEHA) mission is to build, sustain, and empower an effective environmental health workforce. Advancement has been defined by NEHA in terms of both education and motivation. The basis for the association’s activities is the belief that the professional who is educated and motivated is the professional who will make the greatest contribution to the healthful environmental goals we all seek. Accordingly, through each of NEHA’s programs, great emphasis is placed on providing both educational and motivational opportunities. COVID-19 Early Care and Education Collaborative Organizations COVID-19 ECE COLLABORATIVE 10

This project utilized existing strategic partnerships and collaboration maintained and fostered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) and Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) to strengthen coordination and communication around safe practices in ECE settings during the COVID-19 pandemic. More detailed information about Health in All Policies (HiAP) is outlined in NACCHO's Local Health Department Strategies for Implementing Health in All Policies fact sheet. Enhance Workforce Capacity Incorporate Health Into Decision-Making Processes Coordinate Funding and Investments Integrate Research, Evaluation, and Data Systems Implement Accountability Structures Synchronize Communications and Messaging STRATEGIES Develop and Structure Cross-Sector Relationships for Implementing Health in All Policies 7 HiAP is a change in the systems that determine how decisions are made and implemented by local, state, and federal governements to ensure policy decisions have neutral or beneficial impacts on health departments. NACCHO - Health in All Policies THE COLLABORATIVE IN ACTION Embodying the Strategies of Health in All Policies to Foster Collaboration EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 11

The COVID-19 ECE Collaborative used the following process to foster collaboration and successfully implement many of the seven HiAP strategies: 1) coordinated funding and investments, 2) synchronized communications, and 3) messaging and implementing accountability structures. The Nuts and Bolts of Coordination MONTHLY MEETINGS NEHA served as the convener for the Collaborative and was responsible for coordinating and facilitating monthly meetings and communications for the group. Meetings were recorded and monthly notes were provided to partner organizations to ensure all members had access to Collaborative information. During the monthly meetings, each organization had the opportunity to update the group on their ECE-related activities and share any difficulties they were experiencing. The meetings created a forum for members to gain critical situational awareness, coordinate activities and messaging, and crowdsource solutions to challenges as they happened. JOINT COMMUNICATION PLANS NEHA developed a joint communications matrix to help the group coordinate the development and release of tools, resources, and webinars. The matrix facilitated cross-promotion, topical coordination, joint messaging, and the ability to support better implementation and wider dissemination of the developed resources. SHARED WORKPLANS ATSDR worked with each partner at the beginning of the project to establish roles and responsibilities within the Collaborative. A joint project activities matrix was developed and shared with all Collaborative members to coordinate efforts and avoid duplication. The matrix was reviewed during each monthly check-in to ensure continued coordination and provide opportunities for quality improvement and topic refocusing, if needed. COVID-19 ECE COLLABORATIVE 12

Key Successes of the Collaborative Model SAVED RESOURCES EAR TO THE GROUND MET NEEDS BROADENED REACH LEVERAGED EXPERTS AMPLIFIED VOICES NEHA-provided basecamp platform to support coordination of ATSDR’s APPLETREE grantees in support of CEHN. The Basecamp platform was used to connect the Collaborative to meeting notes, recordings, announcements, and developed resources. Each organization conducted on-going assessments of their member's need at state, territorial, tribal, and local jurisdictions and provided this information to the collaborative to help inform existing gaps or confirm the usefulness of resources to the ECE community. Recognizing the gap in resources for home-based childcare settings, NCHH developed resources for the specific audience. Identified language gaps and translated resources into multiple languages. CEHN identified a gap in ventilation guidance for ECEs, NEHA develop a daily checklist with focus on ventilation, air filtration, and chemical usage for ECE professionals to assess indoor air quality risk. Provided speaker recommendations and facilitated introductions for NACCHO’s webinar about disinfection and ventilation in ECE facilities. CEHN partnered with AAP/PEHSU to create a webinar series together, expanding CEHN’s reach by at least 3-fold, and reaching new audiences, namely AAP’s large network of pediatric health care providers. ASTDR, ASTHO, and NEHA presented “Collaborating to Bring COVID-19 Resources to Early Care Education” together at NEHA’s 2021 Annual Educational Conference. ASTHO, CEHN, NACCHO, NCHH, NEHA, and Ohio Department of Health conducted a facilitated discussion on the ECE collaborative work in support of Children’s Environmental Health Day. NEHA connected NCHH to a Spanish translating service to convert home cleaning and disinfection guides for home-based ECE facilities. NEHA developed a centralized clearinghouse of all developed resources and tools and maintained the site on behalf of the group. PEHSU provided content expertise to ASPHN on their Clean Away COVID campaign. The campaign also received an endorsement from the PEHSU Steering Committee.

The COVID-19 ECE Collaborative identified gaps and developed more than 90 resources to educate a range of community collaborators who support early care and education of children across the nation. This included: home- and facility-based ECE providers; licensing agencies; state, territorial, tribal, and local health departments; the environmental health workforce who supports or interacts with childcare facilities; and national associations and accreditation organizations associated with early childhood education. Examples of those resources on COVID-19 in ECE facilities include: NEHA’s COVID ECE webpage, webinars, infographics, fact sheets, assessments, checklist forms, tool kits, and other methods to engage stakeholders. The resources discuss the following topics: disinfection, food handling, disaster preparedness, ventilation, indoor air quality, hand sanitizers, and cleaning products. As mentioned, these materials used a HiAP approach to reach a range of audiences that interact with children and ECE facilities. Each organization developed resources for their specified audience, but those resources were also promoted through all the organizations of the Collaborative. This promotion was a great way to get information to an audience that an organization might not normally connect or interact with. Appendix A and B contain a list of all the resources developed to date as part of the COVID-19 ECE Collaborative between September 14, 2020, and December 31, 2021. THE COLLABORATIVE IMPACT COVID-19 ECE COLLABORATIVE 14

The organizations in the COVID-19 ECE Collaborative have members who look to them for guidance and ECE resources. Some members may only be associated with one organization, which could result in missing important information. This Collaborative provided the opportunity for developed resources to be promoted throughout multiple organizations and allowed developed materials to reach a wider range of audiences. Also, with the use of social media platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn, these products were able to be advertised to ECE stakeholders nationally. The total number of social media followers between all the collaborating organizations was greater than 280,000 followers (Figure 1). This increased reach allowed for the dissemination of resources to a much larger audience compared to individual organization membership distribution. Due to the large number of developed resources, the Collaborative desired to reach as many people and organizations as possible. Through the great work to promote these resources, the Collaborative was able to make over 2,000,000 connections with people and organizations through webinar views, resource downloads, video views, and page clicks (Figure 2). These downloads included assessment documents, fact sheets, infographics, comic strips, and tool kits. There were also several resources translated into different languages to extend the reach to communities where English is not their first language. The variety of resources developed, and the different organizational platforms shared allowed the Collaborative to support ECE facilities in multiple ways. THE COLLABORATIVE DATA DRIVE T 1,582,718 (63.7%) L I 805,812 (32.5%) F 88,869 (3.6%) I 5,258 (0.2%) Combined Social Media Followers Figure 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 15

In summary, the Collaborative gathered a diverse group of organizations that worked together to protect children from COVID-19 and other environmental health hazards. Through this endeavor, Collaborative members were able to coordinate activities, develop critically needed resources, and reach a broad range of ECE practitioners. This project serves as an example of how collaborative partnerships can be rapidly established and implemented in real time to holistically address public health challenges and protect children’s health using HiAP strategies. The COVID-19 ECE Collaborative continued to hold monthly virtual meetings to provide updates, as well as support any partner events through 2021. This action afforded the opportunity for developed resources to be re-promoted to different audiences to maximize awareness and reach of these materials. NEHA also maintained its recurring monthly check-in meetings with CEHN and NCHH to continue coordinating around environmental health activities. Visit the COVID -19 Early Care and Education Collaborative website to access the developed resources and learn about project successes. The number of individuals and organizations reached clearly displays the effectiveness of the Collaborative and illustrates the benefit of bringing stakeholders together to meet public health challenges in real time. THE COLLABORATIVE SUMMARY 1,582,718 (63.7%) 805,812 (32.5%) 88,869 (3.6%) 5,258 (0.2%) Resource Data Metrics Figure 2 COVID-19 ECE COLLABORATIVE 16

Collaborative partnerships can be established in real time and use HiAP strategies to address public health challenges and protect children’s health. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 17

Acknowledgement This project enhancing environmental health capabilities and engagement in coronavirus response efforts was supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of a financial assistance award totaling $447,222 with 100% funded by CDC/HHS and 0% funded by nongovernment source(s). The contents in this document are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement by, CDC/HHS or the U.S. government.

RESOURCE TYPE RESOURCES ASSESSMENT DOCUMENTS • ECE COVID-19 ASSESSMENT FORM | NEHA • ECE COVID-19 CHECKLIST | NEHA FACT SHEETS • CLEAN AWAY COVID - CLEANING & DISINFECTION | ASPHN • COVID-19: HEALTHY INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN CHILD CARE FACILITIES | CEHN • HAND SANITIZER FACT SHEET - FAMILIES | PEHSU • HEALTHY HOMES GUIDE TO SAFE CLEANING AND DISINFECTION (ENGLISH) | NCHH • HEALTHY HOMES GUIDE TO SAFE CLEANING AND DISINFECTION (PLAIN LANGUAGE) | NCHH • INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION FACILITIES | ASTHO • SAFER CLEANING AND DISINFECTING IN CHILD CARE FACILITIES: COVID-19 (PART I - GENERAL GUIDANCE) | CEHN • SAFER DISINFECTION IN CHILD CARE FACILITIES: COVID-19 (PART 2) | CEHN • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE FACT SHEET | PEHSU • SUPPORTED ACTIVITIES - ARKANSAS DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH • SUPPORTED ACTIVITIES - VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH • SUPPORTED ACTIVITIES - KENTUCKY DEPARTMENT FOR PUBLIC HEALTH • SUPPORTED ACTIVITIES - INDIANA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH APPENDIX A Resources Developed September 14, 2020–December 31, 2021 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 19

RESOURCE TYPE RESOURCES INFOGRAPHICS • 10 VALUABLE HEALTHY HOMES RESOURCES FOR HOME-BASED CHILD CARE PROVIDERS | NCHH • CLEAN AWAY COVID THOROUGHLY AND OFTEN | ASPHN • CLEAN AWAY COVID WITH CLEAN HANDS | ASPHN • CLEAN AWAY COVID WITH THE RIGHT TOOLS | ASPHN • CLEANING & SANITIZING TOYS | NEHA • DIAPER CHANGING BEST PRACTICES | NEHA • FOOD PREP & SERVICE | NEHA • IMPROVING INDOOR AIR QUALITY DURING COVID-19 | NEHA • SAFER DISINFECTANTS | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANTS COMIC STRIP - COVID FOCUS | PEHSU • SAFE DISINFECTANTS COMIC STRIP - NON-COVID FOCUS | PEHSU ON-THE-JOB RESOURCES • CHOOSE SAFE PLACES | NEHA • COVID-19 SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING TOOLKIT | CEHN • GREEN CLEANING EARLY CHILD CARE RESOURCE | PEHSU • HOW TO CHOOSE A PORTABLE AIR CLEANER | CEHN • KEY TIMES TO CLEAN TOYS | CDC • SCIENCE BRIEF: SARS-COV-2 AND SURFACE (FOMITE) TRANSMISSION FOR INDOOR COMMUNITY ENVIRONMENTS | CDC • SCHOOL SETTINGS | COVID-19 | CDC • WHEN YOU’VE BEEN FULLY VACCINATED | CDC RESOURCE WEBPAGES • COVID-19 EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION COLLABORATIVE | NEHA • COVID-19 RESOURCES | CEHN • COVID-19 RESPONSE / SAFER DISINFECTANT USE | PEHSU • CLEAN AWAY COVID | ASPHN • ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND COVID-19 RESOURCE LIBRARY | NACCHO • SAFE CLEANING & DISINFECTION | NCHH COVID-19 ECE COLLABORATIVE 20

RESOURCE TYPE RESOURCES VIDEOS • CHOOSING AND USING DISINFECTION PRODUCTS | NCHH • HEALTHY HOUSING 101: VENTILATION | NCHH • KEEP IT ALL CLEAN TO CLEAN AWAY COVID | ASPHN • LIST N SEARCH BY EPA REGISTRATION NUMBER | ASPHN • LIST N SEARCH BY ACTIVE INGREDIENT | ASPHN • SANITIZE FOOD PREP AREAS | ASPHN • USAGE OF MICROFIBER CLEANING CLOTHS | ASPHN • WHAT TO DO IF COVID IS IN YOUR HOME | ASPHN WEBINARS • APPLETREE COVID-19 SUPPLEMENTAL PROJECT | ASTHO • COVID-19 & CHILDREN’S ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH | NACCHO • HEALTHY HOMES GUIDE TO CLEANING AND DISINFECTION: KEY MESSAGES | NCHH • SAFER CLEANING, SANITIZING AND DISINFECTING IN ECE SETTINGS | PEHSU & CEHN • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE – DISINFECTION & STERILIZATION | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE – TOXICITY OF DISINFECTANTS | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE – HAND SANITIZERS | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE – REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE – DISINFECTING DEVICES AND BEST PRACTICES | PEHSU • VENTILATION IN ECE SETTINGS | PEHSU & CEHN EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 21

APPENDIX B Translated Resources LANGUAGE TYPE RESOURCES AMHARIC • CLEANING AND SAFER DISINFECTING COMIC STRIP | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE FACT SHEET | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE INFOGRAPHIC | PEHSU CHINESE • CLEANING AND SAFER DISINFECTING COMIC STRIP | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE FACT SHEET | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE INFOGRAPHIC | PEHSU KOREAN • CLEANING AND SAFER DISINFECTING COMIC STRIP | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE FACT SHEET | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE INFOGRAPHIC | PEHSU PORTUGUESE (BRAZILIAN) • CLEANING AND SAFER DISINFECTING COMIC STRIP | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE FACT SHEET | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE INFOGRAPHIC | PEHSU RUSSIAN • CLEANING AND SAFER DISINFECTING COMIC STRIP | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE FACT SHEET | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE INFOGRAPHIC | PEHSU COVID-19 ECE COLLABORATIVE 22

LANGUAGE TYPE RESOURCES SOMALI • CLEANING AND SAFER DISINFECTING COMIC STRIP | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE FACT SHEET | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE INFOGRAPHIC | PEHSU SPANISH • CLEAN AWAY COVID THOROUGHLY AND OFTEN | ASPHN • CLEAN AWAY COVID WITH CLEAN HANDS | ASPHN • CLEAN AWAY COVID WITH THE RIGHT TOOLS | ASPHN • CLEAN AWAY COVID - CLEANING & DISINFECTION | ASPHN • CLEANING AND SAFER DISINFECTING COMIC STRIP | PEHSU • COVID-19: HEALTHY INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN CHILD CARE FACILITIES | CEHN • HEALTHY HOMES GUIDE TO SAFE CLEANING AND DISINFECTION | NCHH • KEEP IT ALL CLEAN TO CLEAN AWAY COVID VIDEO | ASPHN • SAFER CLEANING AND DISINFECTING IN CHILD CARE FACILITIES: COVID-19 (PART I - GENERAL GUIDANCE) | CEHN • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE FACT SHEET | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE INFOGRAPHIC | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTION IN CHILD CARE FACILITIES: COVID-19 (PART 2) | CEHN • SANITIZE FOOD PREP AREAS VIDEO | ASPHN • USAGE OF MICROFIBER CLEANING CLOTHS VIDEO | ASPHN • WHAT TO DO IF COVID IS IN YOUR HOME VIDEO | ASPHN VIETNAMESE • CLEANING AND SAFER DISINFECTING COMIC STRIP | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE FACT SHEET | PEHSU • SAFER DISINFECTANT USE INFOGRAPHIC | PEHSU EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 23

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